Differences Between a Product Roadmap and a Project Roadmap

When it comes to understanding Product Management, knowing how to create an amazing Product Roadmap is crucial. There are many different types of roadmaps, such as a Product Roadmap, and a Project Roadmap. For now, we’ll be discussing the differences between these two types of roadmaps.

If you’d like to read more about the multiple different types of roadmaps, please refer to our article discussing the different types of roadmaps.

Product Roadmap

A product roadmap is used to specifically communicate the goals and strategies of a company leading up towards the release of a product.

A product roadmap usually contains the following:

  • Goals for the product
  • Strategies and Initiatives
  • Key features reflected within the product, alongside key release dates
  • The overall timeline for the product to be created

A product roadmap typically focuses on the creation and monitoring of the product roadmap.

Project Roadmap

A project roadmap is used to discuss the tasks required to be completed leading up towards the release of a product. In other words, it’s used to describe each project that is scheduled leading up towards the grand unveiling.

Project roadmaps are used primarily to plan internal events, and efforts for the teams.

A project roadmap usually contains the following:

  • Goals for the projects and the objectives
  • Important tasks
  • Resource allocations
  • Timeline for the projects
  • Potential risks and setbacks

A project manager typically focuses on the creation and monitoring of the project roadmap.

Similarities

Of course, both types of roadmaps are crucial to the development of a product. Both of these roadmaps should be informative and be shared both internally and externally to stakeholders, and executives. This will allow them to know the process of the product, and where on the timeline it currently lies.

The sharing of the product roadmap internally to teams will allow them to know the overall strategies to approach, and the overall end date of the product.

The sharing of the project roadmap internally to teams will allow them to know the tasks assigned, and the due dates, as well as the specific milestones on the timeline for the product.

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