Why Product Management

A Product Manager is responsible for the development of a product or service. They are responsible from the starting idea of a product all the way to the launch of it. They come into contact and lead cross-functional teams from different departments in an organization. Whether the product or service will be successful on its launch will depend on the strategies and decisions that the Product Manager makes.

You’re living your life on a day to day basis, but have you ever stopped to wonder what’s the next step for you? What’s the next move after you have settled yourself and have adapted to your current life? There has to be a way for you to advance your career, whether it be a step up in the social ladder, a bigger salary, or even both. How about taking a step outside the box and considering Product Management? The thing about Product Management is that whatever field you are coming from, be it engineering, design, marketing, or a legal field, all have their own advantages when it comes to being a Product Manager.

Let’s understand what a Product Manager is first. A Product Manager is responsible for the development of a product or service. They are responsible from the starting idea of a product all the way to the launch of it. They come into contact and lead cross-functional teams from different departments in an organization. Whether the product or service will be successful on its launch will depend on the strategies and decisions that the Product Manager makes.

This position is a heavy responsibility for a person to bear due to being the one in charge of a product. However, by coming into contact and leading cross-functional teams, the Product Manager gains valuable experience in leadership, decision-making, and breadth of vision. These are all crucial for high positions in organizations, and they can even go and start their own company with what they have learned from being a Product Manager.

Some examples of successful Product Managers would be Kevin Systrom who co-founded Instagram. Another example would be Marissa Mayer who went from a Product Manager at Google to CEO of Yahoo! and has now co-founded a new company with a past colleague.

While being a Product Manager doesn’t guarantee that you will become a CEO or founder, it can certainly build the foundation for you.

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